News > Local News > Local News Briefs Tuesday 10/6/15

Local News Briefs Tuesday 10/6/15

The Oshkosh Police Department
is investigating a pair of thefts.  The 1st
happened at the Skiers Outlet on Wednesday, September 30, 2015 at about 8:00
PM. Two females entered the store and chose several jackets and left the store
without paying for them. They were last seen in a white compact car going east
on STH 44 from the store. One of the female suspects was described as having a
heavy build and orange hair highlights and wearing a black sweatshirt. The
second suspect had a thin build and was wearing a black sweatshirt  The 2nd theft occurred at the
Oshkosh Wal-Mart on Sunday night, October 4th at 7pm.  A male entered the store and removed four
televisions from the store on a cart and loaded them into a silver mini-van.  A female was assisting the suspect.  You’re asked to contact the Oshkosh Police
Department at (920) 236-5700.

 

(WRN)
Last week’s mass shooting in Oregon
is renewing calls for stricter gun control. During a stop in Menomonie on
Monday, Walker tried to shift the focus to
mental health care, saying it’s been a factor in several incidents here in Wisconsin.
Walker says it’s something he’s tried to increase funding
for…although he also argues there’s more to it than that.
The governor says those with mental health issues
should be encouraged to seek treatment.

 

(WRN)
Governor Scott Walker is offering few clues about who he might appoint to fill
a vacancy on the state Supreme Court. Applications to serve out the rest of the
late Justice Patrick Crooks’ term were due last Friday. Walker says they are now under review.
Crooks’
seat is up for reelection in the spring. Only one of the three candidates in
the race, Appeals Court Judge Rebecca Bradley, applied to be considered for the
appointment. Several government watchdog groups have called on the governor to
appoint someone who is not currently running though…citing concerns that it
could set-off a heated campaign much earlier than is necessary.

 

(WRN)
A graduate of the University
of Wisconsin
is awarded
the Nobel Prize for medicine.
 William
Campbell is one of three scientists to recieve the award. He and Satoshi Omura
of Japan were honored for
discovering a drug, derivatives of which helped reduce diseases caused by
parasitic worms, mostly in Asia and Africa.
The other Nobel Prize winner is Tu
Youyou
, China
‘s
first medicine laureate, who created a drug that sharply dropped mortality
rates for malaria. The 85-year-old Campbell
earned a doctorate degree from UW Madison in 1957. He worked for 33 years at
Merck, and is a research fellow-emeritus at Drew
University in New Jersey. 

 

(WRN) A legislative committee
will hold a hearing bill to overhaul Wisconsin’s
civil service system.
 A Senate panel
will hear testimony all day, on replacing the civil service exam with a
resume-based process, making it easier to fire for misconduct, and speeding up
hiring. Senator Roger Roth says it would all mean greater consistency and
fairness
. Roth of Appleton claims
the status quo allows problem state workers to stay employed – like a man
caught looking at pornography
. Democrats
say some reforms may be needed, but the GOP bill will likely go too far.

 

(WRN)
State officials are waging a containment battle against a tree-killing beetle. The
emerald ash borer was first discovered in Wisconsin
north of Milwaukee
in 2008…and it’s been spreading.
State Forester Paul De Long says,
while about 40 counties are now under quarantine for EAB, there’s a huge chunk
of the state where the beetle has not been found. They’re hoping to keep it
that way for as long as possible. The best way, he says, is to prevent the
movement of firewood.

 

(WRN)
The possibility of having a national marine sanctuary along the shoreline of
eastern Wisconsin
is a step closer to becoming a reality. The 875-mile stretch of Lake Michigan
covers a range from Port Washington to Two
Rivers. President Barack Obama has named it as one of two U-S locations being
considered for sanctuary status…much to the excitement of Rolf Johnson,
director of the Wisconsin Maritime Museum
in Manitowoc.
The area
extends out to the middle of Lake Michigan and
is home to at least 39 shipwrecks. Of those, 15 are on the National Register of
Historic Places.